About

I’m a Chicana feminist blogger, so this blog is mostly feminist/Chican@ in scope.  It’s definitely pro-immigrant and progressive.  But it’s also a reflection of things of interest to me, so you will definitely see your share of randomness.

Regarding comments: thanks to past run-ins with trolls, comments require approval before getting posted.    Be patient if you don’t see your comment go up ASAP.  As long as you’re not flaming someone or using offensive/sexist/racist language, you should be fine.

A few things about me, for those inquiring minds that want to know (or not):

  • I’m a women’s historian.  And, duh, a feminist.
  • I teach at a college in south Texas.
  • I have a thing for motherhood analyses in popular culture (even though children generally annoy me after prolonged periods, and I don’t want children).
  • I also have a thing for oral histories.  It’s a dream of mine to start an oral history archive in my hometown.
  • I love animals, and they’re the reason I went vegetarian back in 2000.
  • I have an unnatural love of donuts.  Chocolate iced, hold the sprinkles.
  • It must be said that I think King of the Hill is one of the greatest cartoons ever televised, I tell you whut.  I’m totally devastated that they took it off the air.
  • I’m a Trekkie.  Screw Star Wars.
  • The calendar on the site is titled “Is it Wednesday?” because I always think it’s Wednesday.  Nothing notable happens to me on Wednesdays, either…it’s totally random.
  • These are my boys.

You can contact me at thefeministtexican [at] gmail [dot] com.

You can also follow me on twitter.

15 Responses to About

  1. Tumerica says:

    I like you, Texican gal who lives in NY suburban hell. King of the Hill was my favorite show for years and I’ve only been to Texas once–Dallas. Didn’t even like it, though I enjoyed the food immensely (chipotle scrambled eggs at the IHOP–whoo-hoo!). I never had a thing for kids until I actually got pregnant at the age of 40 (I had been scared to death of bringing a child into this world. What me? I’m not even grown up yet, I thought.) So I am with you on that respect. I have three siblings who chose not to have kids and I salute them–the world needs more aunties and uncles to hang out with our kids. And it can be very fun to hang out with kids who are not yours and to whom you can say good-bye after a few hours of magical entertainment–or not–it’s all good. One of those siblings is a women’s gender issues historian who has written several books.

  2. earlgreyrooibos says:

    Suzanne Riesman of BlogHer linked to you, I checked it out, and I think I am in love.

    Also, we have the same WordPress theme.

    Also, I am a Texas Transplant. I moved to Austin 6 weeks ago. Although I’m still not entirely sure whether people actually consider Austin part of Texas.

  3. Paige says:

    I am an art student taking a Latin American art history class. We have to write a paper on any Latin American art topic. I am most interested in the evolution on the female figure throughout Latina history, from pre-Columbian anthropomorphic goddesses of sacrifice, through the legend of Guadalupe, to the use of these historic images as an influence on the Chicana feminist movement. This is too broad a topic, obviously, but it interests me a great deal as a white female from a largely Hispanic town exploring Latina art and culture. Your blog is a cornucopia of ideas I can use to narrow my research! I think I am now going pursue the influence of the Virgin of Guadalupe upon Chicana artists. Eh… I’m still unsure, though!! There is just so much to discuss! It seems Latinas had the strongest voice of the feminist art movement, and I want to explore why that is. Anyway, thanks for posting your blog! And feel free to email me if you have any opinions or suggestions as a strong-spirited Chicana woman.
    (I speak Spanish just like Peggy.)

  4. I just stumbled on your page after doing a search for Hutto. I like what I see so far, but I was wondering why your RSS feed is different than the blog front page. I want to make sure that I have all of the up to date stuff on your blog

    Hector
    OurNewAnahuac.net

  5. adrian says:

    good stuff….

  6. calitexican says:

    i love the name of your blog. just discovered it. look forward to reading it (when not at work). 🙂

    best,
    calitexican

  7. Lala says:

    Hmmm… I love the blog and your politics, but I was quite annoyed by the anti-feminist “I’d rather die than birth a spawn” quote. As a Tejana who has had three children as a doctoral student and who publishes on Chicana feminist motherhood, I am always taken aback by the knee-jerk reaction many feminists have to motherhood, as if “mother” is a sign for “anti-intellectual.” The anti-child movement is laden with language of objectification, and to suggest that we “birth spawns” only reifies our objectification as mothers of color. Mexican mothers, especially, continue to struggle with the legacy of the rhetoric that led to the forced sterilization of hundreds of mexican women, women who were perceived as “breeders” who were threatening the racial sovereignty of the U.S.

    Please, from one feminist to another, don’t perpetuate this language of child-hate and misogyny.

  8. Melissa says:

    Hi Lala,

    I stated it flippantly, but there’s a myriad of reasons (some more complicated than others) why I don’t want children. Not wanting kids has nothing to do with me thinking that motherhood is anti-intellectual; in fact, my master’s thesis was about Mexican immigrant motherhood in Chican@ literature. I absolutely respect a woman’s decision to become a mother.

    I’m sorry I offended you. I’ll change the language.

  9. gloria says:

    first and foremost I want to say how awesome it is that I stumbled on a blog like yours!

    I find that fashion blogs are my guilty pleasure but I love to read blogs that are genuine and intelligent as well as beautifully written and not about the latest trend. I must say that admire what you stand for and the fact that you call things out like they are!

    you have found another dedicated follower of your blog!

    gloria
    http://dresshangsthere.blogspot.com/
    p.s. although it is a fashion blog im thinking about making a specific chicana feminist one or just mixing it in with what I have now.

  10. Melissa says:

    hi gloria! glad you like it. welcome to the blog! 🙂

  11. Student says:

    I am an art student taking a Latin American art history class. We have to write a paper on any Latin American art topic. I am most interested in the evolution on the female figure throughout Latina history, from pre-Columbian anthropomorphic goddesses of sacrifice, through the legend of Guadalupe, to the use of these historic images as an influence on the Chicana feminist movement. This is too broad a topic, obviously, but it interests me a great deal as a white female from a largely Hispanic town exploring Latina art and culture. Your blog is a cornucopia of ideas I can use to narrow my research! I think I am now going pursue the influence of the Virgin of Guadalupe upon Chicana artists. Eh… I’m still unsure, though!! There is just so much to discuss! It seems Latinas had the strongest voice of the feminist art movement, and I want to explore why that is. Anyway, thanks for posting your blog! And feel free to email me if you have any opinions or suggestions as a strong-spirited Chicana woman.(I speak Spanish just like Peggy.)
    +1

  12. Mark says:

    Lived in Dallas for 10 years. “King of the Hill” is NOT fiction, but a truly accurate protrayal of life in parts of Texas.

    As veg in Texas I went through hell, can’t imagine what it’s like for a feminist.

    Hat’s off to ya!

  13. Jennifer O. says:

    Hi, Melissa. I’m also from RGV (and Hispanic!) and am excited when I see anyone from there with a book blog, bc when I was growing up, (ahem), I didn’t know anyone else who enjoyed reading. I recently started my own blog a couple of months ago as a 32nd yr birthday present to myself. I’m a feminist, but a stay at home mom. You don’t need to point out the contradictions: I live and struggle with them every day. I found your blog through Twitter and am glad I did!

  14. heidi says:

    I was googling for feminist short stories and found your other blog… aaand I love you. I’ve barely scratched the surface of either blog, but as a bookworm and feminist Texan (met my spouse at Santa Ana NWR!) …it’s just incredibly reassuring to know you’re out there. Growing up in Houston was odd, politically, but as I moved to smaller and smaller towns, I finally got to know myself – and now I live in a teeeeeny town of about 400 people and it’s amazing. West Texas is awesome. We have book nerds and old hippies and a few young hippies and… yeah. But all of my internet feminism seems to be from any coast that isn’t the Gulf. So it’s just fantastic to see local content! Rock on!

  15. Heather A McBride says:

    I’m bookmarking your blog. As a grad student in literature, it is difficult to find information on Chicana feminist literature that postdates 2002. I was happy to see that you had plenty of leads for me to follow. If you have any more suggestions please don’t hesitate to email me.

    Keep up the great blog.

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